China Economic Journal Volume 5. No. 1. 2012 目录摘要

发布日期:2012-11-06 11:10:22    来源:北京大学国家发展研究院

Table of Content 期刊目录

1. The Chinese economy and income inequality among East Asian countries

Sumie Sato & Mototsugu Fukushige

Pages 1-15

 

2. Structural changes and regional disparity in China's inflation: a revisit

Aviral Kumar Tiwari & Suresh K.G.

Pages 17-28

 

3. How will fertility imbalances affect the human capital structure in China? Evidence from the National Family Planning and Fertility Health Survey

Xiaoyan Lei, Yan Shen & Xiaxin Wang

Pages 29-45

 

4. Land titling in China: Chengdu experiment and its consequences

Lixing Li

Pages 47-64

 

Article Abstract 文章摘要

1. The Chinese economy and income inequality among East Asian countries

Sumie Sato & Mototsugu Fukushige

Pages 1-15

Abstract: Using the Atkinson inequality measure of income distribution, we analyze the impact of China as a single country and examine the effect of its domestic income inequality on total income inequality among East Asian countries. First, we find that China's domestic income inequality has increased since 1990. However, the inequality of China's domestic income distribution is still at a low level among East Asian countries as a whole. Second, the growth of China's per capita gross domestic product (GDP) had an equalizing effect on income distribution in a framework of Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) + China, but this effect was reversed around 1997. However, relative to higher income countries such as Japan and South Korea, China's per capita GDP remains low, and although China has in the past contributed to income inequality in the area, it has recently had a more equalizing effect.   
Link to the original text:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2012.733062

 

2. Structural changes and regional disparity in China's inflation: a revisit

Aviral Kumar Tiwari & Suresh K.G.

Pages 17-28

Abstract: The study re-examined the time series properties and regional disparities in Chinese inflation by extending the work of Chong, Zhang, and Feng (2011). For this purpose we employed the Lagrange Multiplier (LM) unit root test with one structural break and two structural breaks suggested by Lee and Strazicich (20032004) and a recently developed ADF type unit root test with two structural breaks of Narayan and Popp (2010). We found that national, urban and rural series of the overall inflation series, clothing, and food, national series of education and residence and the rural series of residence and education are stationary. We also found regional disparity in Chinese inflation, but the disparities existed only in education inflation series.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2011.698087

 

3. How will fertility imbalances affect the human capital structure in China? Evidence from the National Family Planning and Fertility Health Survey

Xiaoyan Lei, Yan Shen & Xiaxin Wang

Pages 29-45

Abstract: Using the National Family Planning and Fertility Health Survey of 1997 and 2001, we document the preferred fertility level, the actual fertility level and the imbalance between these two for Chinese women. We further study the associations of these outcomes with human capital structure measured by education levels and try to explore the mechanisms behind these associations. The main finding is that there exists severe fertility imbalance in China, and the direction of imbalance is opposite in urban and rural regions. Education plays an important role in determining such imbalance even taking into account other socioeconomic factors. In addition, we find evidence showing that besides economic factors, institutional factors such as the family planning policy may have contributed to the fertility imbalance and the role of education.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2012.723861

 

4. Land titling in China: Chengdu experiment and its consequences

Lixing Li

Pages 47-64

Abstract: The lack of transfer rights for collectively owned land has led to inefficient land use and rising urban–rural income inequality in China, which calls for property rights reform in the rural area. This article studies the land titling experiment in Chengdu since 2008. Based on field surveys and analysis of data on land transactions, we find that rural residents' income and wealth increased significantly after achieving transfer rights on collectively owned land. The implied land price is found to be correlated with the strength of property rights. With land titling, the market for rural construction land is growing in Chengdu. We argue that a property rights reform that changes the primary role of rural land from welfare to property will provide China with an opportunity to achieve urban–rural harmony and land-use efficiency while maintaining its fast urbanization process.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2012.719287