China Economic Journal Volume 7. No. 2. 2014 目录摘要

发布日期:2014-10-14 11:18:34    来源:北京大学国家发展研究院

Special Issue:   Chinese Overseas Direct Investment

Table of Content 期刊目录

1. Understanding China’s foreign trade: a literature review (I)

Larry D. Qiu & Ying Xue

Pages 168-186

 

2. An Anatomy of Intermediaries in China’s Export Market

Bo Chen & Zhiyuan Li

Pages 187-213

 

3. Exchange Rate Movements and Exporter Profitability: Empirical Evidence from Chinese Manufacturing Sectors

Zhonghua Liang & Miaojie Yu

Pages 214-220

 

4. Asia–Pacific integration within a broader Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

Xin Li & Yang Yao

Pages 221-236

 

5. Sino-Korea Free Trade Agreement and Asia-Pacific economic integration: the China perspective

Rui Zhuang, Junjie Hong & Guangyu Bai

Pages 237-250

 

6. Trans-Pacific Tariff Barriers: a Case Study of Five Asia—Pacific Developing Countries and Canada

Bo Chen

Pages 251-260

 

7. Revisiting the Role of Regional Integration in China from 1978–1992: Incentive, Pattern, and Growth

Xiaopeng Yin & Zhe Wang

Pages 261-276

 

Article Abstract 文章摘要

1. Understanding China’s foreign trade: a literature review (I)

Larry D. Qiu & Ying Xue

Pages 168-186

Abstract: With the objective of gaining a better understanding of China’s foreign trade, this paper provides a literature survey based on recent research output published in major economic journals. It covers topics on the general features and characteristics of China’s trade described at the country level and industry level, the impacts of China’s foreign trade on economic growth and technology progress, and the performance of Chinese firms engaging in international trade. We also provide some critical summaries and comments on the existing studies for each topic. 
Link to the original text:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2014.928967

 

2. An Anatomy of Intermediaries in China’s Export Market

Bo Chen & Zhiyuan Li

Pages 187-213

Abstract: Analyzing firm-level exports of China, especially those conducted by intermediaries, from 2000 to 2006 reveals a number of interesting findings. Regarding the role of intermediaries in China’s exports, we find the following: first, intermediaries became less important when China’s overall export grew. Second, intermediaries are more important for ordinary exports than for processing exports. Third, intermediaries are more important for relatively homogeneous products such as textiles and apparel than for differentiated products such as machinery. Fourth, intermediaries are concentrated in economically developed cities. However, intermediaries became less important for a particular city if that city’s GDP per capita grew. Fifth, intermediaries ship a smaller share of exports through Hong Kong than do manufacturing firms, indicating that intermediaries assumed some of the intermediating function of Hong Kong. For policy changes over this period that affected intermediaries, we find that: first, deregulation policies on setting up intermediaries induced a growing proportion of privately owned intermediaries among all intermediary exporters. Second, trade liberalization, characterized by trade policy uncertainty reduction due to World Trade Organization (WTO) accession, caused more entries into the export market by manufacturing firms than by intermediaries.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2014.928968

 

3. Exchange Rate Movements and Exporter Profitability: Empirical Evidence from Chinese Manufacturing Sectors

Zhonghua Liang & Miaojie Yu

Pages 214-220

Abstract: Most products exported by Chinese manufacturing firms are characterized by high labor-intensity and low markup. Renminbi (RMB) appreciation undoubtedly worsens this situation as exporters have to pay RMB-denominated wages and charge dollar-denominated prices. This paper studies the correlation between exchange rate movements and the profitability of exporters. We find significant negative effects of RMB appreciation on the profitability of exporters.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2014.928971

 

4. Asia–Pacific integration within a broader Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

Xin Li & Yang Yao

Pages 221-236

Abstract: The current progress and status of regional trade arrangements worldwide reveals competition between countries for dominance of new global trade rules. To a great extent, safeguarding the interests of China in the post-crisis era will be a significant political project that will enable China to participate in the new round of global economic governance. This paper uses the updated GTAP CGE framework to describe potential outcomes for the different choices of the Chinese government. First, if the TPP Agreement, which includes China, clearly promotes the economies of the U.S. and Japan. Second, Southeast Asian countries that mainly undertake the transfer of general labor-intensive manufacturing from China can benefit more if the TPP Agreement excludes China, whereas the countries that mainly undertake the transfer of processing manufacturing from China can obtain more benefits if the TPP Agreement includes China. Finally, the TPP Agreement with China is conducive to further strengthening China’s influence on the process of economic integration in the Asia–Pacific region.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2014.928972

 

5. Sino-Korea Free Trade Agreement and Asia-Pacific economic integration: the China perspective

Rui Zhuang, Junjie Hong & Guangyu Bai

Pages 237-250

Abstract: As an important element of Asian economic integration, a Sino-Korea (hereinafter referred to as South Korea only) Free Trade Agreement (FTA) is currently under negotiation. This paper analyses the potentially sensitive issues that might hinder the progress of the negotiations. We believe that a Sino-Korea FTA would exert great pressure on Japan, which may push forward China—Japan—Korea FTA negotiations. Economic integration in Northeast Asia will promote RCEP and FTAAP as well. Therefore, the Sino—Korea FTA should be viewed from a strategic perspective, and could be an important step towards Asia-Pacific economic integration.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2014.928973

 

6. Trans-Pacific Tariff Barriers: a Case Study of Five Asia—Pacific Developing Countries and Canada

Bo Chen

Pages 251-260

Abstract: Though the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) is believed to greatly benefit the developing countries of the Asia—Pacific (AP) region, most of the countries, such as China, are still hesitant to join. The major concern for these countries is whether or not the gains from the free trade provisions of the TPP will provide enough of an advantage given that most of them have already joined the WTO. In this paper, I first apply Feenstra’s (1995) TRI to gauge the actual Canadian tariff barriers facing five Asia—Pacific developing countries: China, Thailand, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Indonesia. The calculation of TRIs enables us to estimate the gains (from retrieving deadweight loss due to tariff distortion) to Canada if it completely removes its tariff barriers from the 2010 level against the five exporting countries. The gains for Canada would reach USD 276.45 million solely from China’s exports, and another USD 33.96 million total from the four other countries. Then, based on the gravity model, I estimate the impact of tariff reduction on imports and the gains, in terms of possible export growth, to the five developing countries. I find China’s exports to Canada may increase by 60.58%. Export growth then would be 68.21% for Indonesia, 39.77% for Malaysia, 69.64% for the Philippines, and 42.62% for Thailand.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2014.928975

 

7. Revisiting the Role of Regional Integration in China from 1978–1992: Incentive, Pattern, and Growth

Xiaopeng Yin & Zhe Wang

Pages 261-276

Abstract: We reexamine the role of regional integration (or local protectionism) in China, by exploring its effect on local growth rates from 1978–1992, the first fifteen years of China’s economic reform and “open door” period. Our results show that at least in the initial period of China’s reform, domestic interregional trade was the main factor driving regional growth, much higher than corresponding international trade. Additionally, given such circumstances, the paper studies the effects that could have been obtained if regional, i.e., provincial, governments had put different restrictions on interregional trade, and what the incentives would be for such a policy. We find that any form of economic integration always makes both regions better off, as long as the level of technology in each region is different. We also explore other protectionist policies such as a prohibition on local human capital out-flows, and local intellectual property protection within a region. We include a discussion of relevant policies.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2014.933497