China Economic Journal Volume 8. No. 2. 2015 目录摘要

发布日期:2015-08-17 11:20:45    来源:北京大学国家发展研究院

Table of Content 期刊目录

1. China’s economic reforms and growth prospects

Nicholas Lardy

Pages 95-108

 

2. Reflections on economics: market failure or market theory failure? (Editorial)

Weiying Zhang

Pages 109-121

 

3. The patterns of patents in China

Zhuan Xie & Xiaobo Zhang

Pages 122-142

 

4. Several major issues on deepening state-owned enterprises reform

Changwen Zhao & Yongwei Zhang

Pages 143-157

 

5. What did China’s labor contract law do to its private manufacturing firms?

Ping Yan

Pages 158-171

 

6. Fertility and housing

Creina Day

Pages 172-190

 

Article Abstract 文章摘要

1. China’s economic reforms and growth prospects

Nicholas Lardy

Pages 95-108

Abstract: Conventional wisdom attributes China’s rapid economic growth to its model of state capitalism, which combines direct state ownership of the commanding heights of the economy and indirect state control of the rest of the economy through industrial policies and the allocation of credit through state-owned banks. This article argues that China’s growth since 1978 is largely due to the result of the expanding role of markets and the rise of private business. If China systematically adopts the economic reform agenda endorsed by the Chinese Communist Party in the fall of 2013, it likely will avoid a sustained period of much slower growth that some have forecast. 
Link to the original text:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1061247

 

2. Reflections on economics: market failure or market theory failure? (Editorial)

Weiying Zhang

Pages 109-121

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1070481

 

3. The patterns of patents in China

Zhuan Xie & Xiaobo Zhang

Pages 122-142

Abstract: Innovations are a key driver of long-term economic growth. There has been an explosion of patent filings in China in the past three decades. But empirical studies on the pattern of innovations at the firm level are rather scant primarily due to lack of firm-specific patent data. We have made concerted efforts to match Chinese patent data with a large firm-level database. The matched dataset enables us to examine the patterns of patents at the firm level. Our analysis has revealed several interesting patterns: (1) domestic firms have become increasingly more innovative in terms of patent application; (2) private firms, rather than state-owned enterprises, have been the engine of innovation; (3) rising wages have propelled labor-intensive sectors to become more innovative; and (4) in response to increasing sex ratio imbalances, firms in female-intensive industries have exhibited more innovations than those in male-intensive industries.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1046219

 

4. Several major issues on deepening state-owned enterprises reform

Changwen Zhao & Yongwei Zhang

Pages 143-157

Abstract: This paper evaluates the situations that state-owned enterprises (SOEs) reform in the new round are likely to be happened, proposes theoretical innovation will play an essential role in the current deepening SOEs reform; and emphasizes several important issues that need to be taken to help ensure the success, including: clear objectives and important tasks; exploring different ways of implementing SOEs reform; to further improve the state-owned capital management system, and so on.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1061738

 

5. What did China’s labor contract law do to its private manufacturing firms?

Ping Yan

Pages 158-171

Abstract: Well-intended employment protection legislation may have adverse consequences. This paper uses Chinese firm-level data to assess the impacts of China’s Labor Contract Law, effective on January 1, 2008. My results show that, relative to public firms, private firms as a whole were negatively affected in terms of firm-level year-to-year employment changes. The law had negligible effects on employment and wages in firms with high wages. At the same time, employment fell and wages rose in firms with low wages. Moreover, firms who did not train workers intensively to acquire firm-specific skills had more job turnover than firms who did. Finally, I study how labor demand responded to the law along the extensive margin. For regions that experienced abrupt declines in labor mobility, possibly due to stricter labor regulation enforcement following the enactment of the Labor Contract Law, firm exit rose significantly, suggesting large incidence of mass layoff.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1070492

 

6. Fertility and housing

Creina Day

Pages 172-190

Abstract: Young households in Hong Kong face particularly steep increases in house prices and low fertility despite low gender wage gaps. The model of fertility and housing in this paper explains why fertility decline need not reverse as female wages rise relative to male wages where housing land is scarce. For given house prices, demand for children may rise with female relative wages if housing comprises a sufficiently large share of childrearing. If the user cost of housing falls with rising house prices then fertility also rises. For endogenous house prices, however, growth in wages and a burgeoning working age population raises the market price of housing. In turn, fertility no longer rises with female relative wages. The analysis provides a novel mechanism whereby high population support ratios depress fertility and the results fit recent evidence that house prices affect fertility.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1080907