China Economic Journal Volume 8. No. 3. 2015 目录摘要

发布日期:2015-12-18 16:05:40    来源:北京大学国家发展研究院

Table of Content 期刊目录

1. Living arrangements of the elderly in China: evidence from the CHARLS national baseline

Xiaoyan Lei, John Strauss, Meng Tian & Yaohui Zhao

Pages 191-214

 

2. Environmental regulation and firm location choice in China

Qingtao Wang, Xuanli Xie & Min Wang

Pages 215-234

 

3. Short-term trends in China’s income inequality and poverty: evidence from a longitudinal household survey

Yu Xie, Xiaobo Zhang, Qi Xu & Chunni Zhang

Pages 235-251

 

4. Inequality in educational attainment and expectation: evidence from the China Family Panel Studies

Xiaoyan Lei & Yan Shen

Pages 252-263

 

5. Evolution of wealth inequality in China

Shi Li & Haiyuan Wan

Pages 264-287

 

6. Understanding wealth and housing inequality among China’s older population

Albert Park & Yan Shen

Pages 288-307

 

Article Abstract 文章摘要

1. Living arrangements of the elderly in China: evidence from the CHARLS national baseline

Xiaoyan Lei, John Strauss, Meng Tian & Yaohui Zhao

Pages 191-214

Abstract: Declining fertility in China has raised concerns about elderly support, especially when public support is inadequate. Using rich information from the nationally representative China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) baseline survey, we describe the patterns of current living arrangements of the Chinese elderly and investigate their determinants and correlation with intergenerational transfers. We find that roughly 41% of Chinese aged 60 and over live with an adult child; living with a male adult child being strongly preferred. However another 34% have an adult child living in the same immediate neighborhood and 14% in the same county; only 5% have an adult child with none of them living in the same county. At the same time, a large fraction of the elderly, 45% in our sample, live alone or with only a spouse. In general, women, those from western provinces, and those from rural areas are more likely to live with or close to their adult children than their corresponding counterparts, but different types of intergenerational transfers play a supplementary role in the unequal distribution of living arrangements. Among non-co-resident children, those living close by visit their parents more frequently and have more communications by other means. In contrast, children who live farther away are more likely to send financial and in-kind transfers and send larger amounts. 
Link to the original text:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1102473

 

2. Environmental regulation and firm location choice in China

Qingtao Wang, Xuanli Xie & Min Wang

Pages 215-234

Abstract: How may environmental regulation affect firm location choice? While this question has generated great research interest from high-standard, industrial economies, in this article we turn the spotlight to low-standard, developing countries and use China’s Census of Manufactures data during 2003–2008 to explore how firms with different ownership, during different policy regimes as well as from different industries may respond to environmental regulations in different ways. Results show environmental stringency has a positive effect on state-owned enterprises’ location choice during 2003–2005, but the effect becomes insignificant during 2006–2008. Private-owned enterprises, foreign-owned enterprises and collective-owned enterprises are more likely to enter areas with less stringent environmental regulations during 2003–2005. However, this pattern is reversed for the period of 2006–2008. Furthermore, the above relationships are more pronounced for firms in polluting industries.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1102474

 

3. Short-term trends in China’s income inequality and poverty: evidence from a longitudinal household survey

Yu Xie, Xiaobo Zhang, Qi Xu & Chunni Zhang

Pages 235-251

Abstract: In the past three decades, income inequality in China has increased rapidly relative to both China’s own past and other countries at similar levels of economic development. Using recent longitudinal data from the China Family Panel Studies (CFPS), this article examines changes in income inequality and poverty prevalence between 2010 and 2012. Surprisingly, we find a modest decline in income inequality as measured by the Gini coefficients in the CFPS data. The urban–rural gap narrowed, with rural families enjoying faster income growth than urban families enjoyed. Income growth was greater for middle-income families than for families with either high or low incomes in 2010. By all measures, poverty was greatly reduced between 2010 and 2012. Two-thirds of families that had been poor in 2010 escaped poverty by 2012.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1108118

 

4. Inequality in educational attainment and expectation: evidence from the China Family Panel Studies

Xiaoyan Lei & Yan Shen

Pages 252-263

Abstract: This article studies educational inequalities in China by measuring both educational attainment and educational expectations using the 2010 nationally representative data from the China Family Panel Study. We find that educational inequalities have increased over the past several decades, and these inequalities are mainly reflected in the widening gaps in higher education between rural and urban residents. This is true for both educational attainment and expectations. Because parental education level is another significant factor affecting both educational attainment and expectations, imminent measures are needed to stop the vicious cycle of translating existing educational inequalities into larger inequalities in later generations.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1108119

 

5. Evolution of wealth inequality in China

Shi Li* & Haiyuan Wan

Pages 264-287

Abstract: Household wealth is a key indicator that reflects national economic competiveness and individual income levels. The distribution of wealth is central for evaluating social justice in a country. This article uses a data set composed of the 2002 China Household Income Project and the 2010 Chinese Family Panel Survey to analyze the level of wealth and wealth inequality in China during 2002 and 2010. The analysis decomposes the evolution of wealth inequality during that period in terms of the structure and composition of wealth. The findings show that there was a large increase in the quantity of wealth and wealth inequality between 2002 and 2010. The level of wealth in 2010 was four times that of 2002, and housing assets were the greatest component of overall wealth in 2010. Wealth inequality also rose dramatically after 2002, with the Gini coefficient of the distribution of wealth increasing from 0.538 in 2002 to 0.739 in 2010. The rapidly escalating price of housing has been the main contributor to increasing wealth inequality in recent years.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1110338

 

6. Understanding wealth and housing inequality among China’s older population

Albert Park & Yan Shen

Pages 288-307

Abstract: In this article we study wealth inequality of China’s older population aged 45 and older using data from the 2011 national baseline of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS). As housing wealth accounts for the lion’s share of household wealth in China, we provide detailed analysis of housing wealth differences in China, including an assessment of the importance of housing windfalls associated with housing reforms in the 1990s and market price increases for housing. Our calculations indicate that in 2010, the wealth Gini coefficient is 0.69, and the wealthiest 20% of the population account for about three-quarters of total wealth while the bottom 50% account for only 5.73% of total wealth. We show that the majority of today’s wealth is the result of windfall gains, especially rapid increases in housing prices.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2015.1110339