China Economic Journal Volume 10. No. 1. 2017目录/摘要

发布日期:2017-03-14 11:27:19    来源:北京大学国家发展研究院

Table of Content 期刊目录

1.    Introduction to the special issue on firm performance and worker heterogeneity using Chinese Employer-Employee Survey (CEES) dataset

Miaojie Yu

Pages: 1-3

 

2. International trade and firm innovation: patterns and evidence from the Chinese Employer-Employee Survey data

Wei Tian, Miaojie Yu & Rui Zhang

Pages: 4-17

 

3. The challenge to china’s enterprises from increasing labor costs: the product quality perspective

Dandan Li, Ting Tang, Dezhuang Hu, Feifei Song & Lianfa Luo

Pages: 18-33

 

4. Quality-oriented growth: a new trend for Chinese firms

Tang Li, Pingtian Wang, Xingyan Liu & Hong Cheng

Pages: 34-46

 

5. Understanding the divergence of manufacturing enterprisesʼ profitability in China

Hongwei Yu, Wenjin Chen, Ying Huang, Shilei Song & Hong Cheng

Pages: 47-60

 

6. Does government paternalistic care promote entrepreneurship in China? Evidence from the China Employer-Employee Survey

Hong Cheng, Dezhuang Hu, Chengyu Xu, Kai Zhang & Hanbing Fan

Pages: 61-75

 

7. Effect of cognitive abilities and non-cognitive abilities on labor wages: empirical evidence from the Chinese Employer-Employee Survey

Fan Yu, Chu Wang, Jun Shen, Yuxuan Shi & Tang Li

Pages: 76-89

 

8. Labor rights in Chinese manufacturing firms: an empirical analysis based on the China Employer-Employee Survey data

Yue Deng, Shiya Huang, Limei Lin, Lu Ning, Cheng Zhang & Han Li

Pages: 90-105

 

Article Abstract 文章摘要

1.    Introduction to the special issue on firm performance and worker heterogeneity using Chinese Employer-Employee Survey (CEES) dataset

Miaojie Yu

Pages: 1-3

Abstract: The Chinese Employer-Employee Survey (CEES) is the first dataset that links firm performance with worker heterogeneity in China, and therefore is a precious data resource for various research topics. This note introduces the CEES dataset, as well as seven papers that serve as the initial step in applying the CEES dataset. The topics covered include interaction between firm-level behavior and worker-level features, for example, firm innovation, quality upgrading, government intervention, worker’s cognitive and non-cognitive abilities, and labor protection. The ample information documented by CEES dataset is worth exploring in the future research agenda.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2016.1274009

 

2. International trade and firm innovation: patterns and evidence from the Chinese Employer-Employee Survey data

Wei Tian, Miaojie Yu & Rui Zhang

Pages: 4-17

Abstract: How international trade fosters firm innovation is crucial in understanding how economic integration boosts productivity growth. This study uses the Chinese Employer-Employee Survey data set, which contains detailed, firm-level information on exports, imports, and innovation. The study documents several stylized facts characterizing the interaction between international trade and innovation among Chinese firms. The main findings are that exporters and importers are exceptional in production and innovation; exporters are more inclined to import material and machinery inputs; domestic and private firms do not seem to be more innovative than their counterparts.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2016.1274008

 

3. The challenge to china’s enterprises from increasing labor costs: the product quality perspective

Dandan Li, Ting Tang, Dezhuang Hu, Feifei Song & Lianfa Luo

Pages: 18-33

Abstract: Using China Employer–Employee Survey data, this paper investigates the possible heterogeneous results of increasing labor costs of different firms. The paper finds that, unskilled labors have a higher wage growth rate than the skilled labor. Firms with higher product quality employ more skilled labor, and thus are less affected by the increasing labor costs. On the other hand, firms with higher product quality have less elastic demand, which makes it possible for them to increase their prices without demand decreasing. The conclusions are well supported by the data. Therefore, we should treat the challenge of increasing labor cost in a new way. The real challenge of increasing labor cost is greater for low-quality firms. The empirical results suggest that some of the low-quality firms should upgrade their quality to a higher level to offset their labor cost increase.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2016.1274003

 

4. Quality-oriented growth: a new trend for Chinese firms

Tang Li, Pingtian Wang, Xingyan Liu & Hong Cheng

Pages: 34-46

Abstract: Based on data from the China Employer-Employee Survey (CEES), this study analyses the actual effect of quality-driven growth on firms’ performances in the economic transition of recent years. The results show positive and significant effects between the firms’ performance and quality-oriented growth, which is defined as a strategy that supports the spirit of greater entrepreneurial innovation, the advancement of input quality, and corporate governance improvement. Using a quality-driven growth mode, firms can effectively relieve the adverse effect of downward macroeconomic growth pressure on performance. This study proposes that China’s macroeconomic policy should shift from demand-oriented management to supply-oriented management, with a particular focus on quality development strategy. Moreover, firms should establish a quality-driven development strategy, facilitating a spirit of entrepreneurial innovation, advancing input quality, and improving corporate governance. This strategy will increase the firm’s performance, and effectively relieve the macroeconomic downward pressure.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2016.1274006

 

5. Understanding the divergence of manufacturing enterprisesʼ profitability in China

Hongwei Yu, Wenjin Chen, Ying Huang, Shilei Song & Hong Cheng

Pages: 47-60

Abstract: The transition of the Chinese economy is placing increasing pressure on manufacturing enterprises to become more profitable. In this article, we first calculate and analyze the profitability of Chinese manufacturing enterprises based on data from the 2015 Chinese Enterprises–Employees Survey (CEES 2015), and find that there is an obvious profitability divergence tendency of manufacturing enterprises. We then analyze the different actions and strategies that may cause the profitability divergence and find that aggressive strategies in innovation, diversification, market development, and conservative strategies in production expansion tend to result in a good profitability, while the opposite strategies in each action lead a poor profitability. The different adoption of strategies in diverse actions may the possible causes of profitability divergence.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2016.1273629

 

6. Does government paternalistic care promote entrepreneurship in China? Evidence from the China Employer-Employee Survey

Hong Cheng, Dezhuang Hu, Chengyu Xu, Kai Zhang & Hanbing Fan

Pages: 61-75

Abstract: This article examines whether government paternalistic care exerts positive effects on entrepreneurship in China, and the channels through which paternalistic care affects entrepreneurship, using data from the 2015 baseline of the China Employer-Employee Survey (CEES). The data suggests that over 70% of manufacturing firms received at least one type of government paternalistic care, though the distributions are different depending on the firm’s size, ownership, industry, firm and entrepreneur’s age. The empirical analysis indicates that government paternalistic care negatively affects entrepreneurship by diminishing innovation capability. Human capital and imported intermediate goods should be the driving forces for a firm’s development, but government paternalistic care has a counterproductive effect on those two factors, thereby impeding entrepreneurship. The results show that those good intentions have gone awry. The government should gradually terminate its paternalistic policies for firms, and firms need to promote their own solid innovation capability.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2016.1274004

 

7. Effect of cognitive abilities and non-cognitive abilities on labor wages: empirical evidence from the Chinese Employer-Employee Survey

Fan Yu, Chu Wang, Jun Shen, Yuxuan Shi & Tang Li

Pages: 76-89

Abstract: The existing literature suggests that worker’s cognitive and non-cognitive abilities have a significant impact on wages. However, presently there is little research in this area of ​​China’s labor force, due to scanty data. To this end, this Paper conducted a CEES-based data research, which found that, the cognitive and non-cognitive abilities of male, skilled workers have a greater impact on their wages, as compared with those of the female, unskilled workers. The OLS regression based on the Mincer Wage Equation found that, the impact of non-cognitive abilities on wages is generally larger than that of the cognitive abilities. All cognitive abilities have a positive impact on wages, wherein English proficiency has the greatest elasticity of wages, which is 12.1%. Of all non-cognitive abilities, Conscientiousness has the highest wage elasticity, which is 13.6%, whereas Agreeableness has a negative wage elasticity of −6.32%.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2016.1274005

 

8. Labor rights in Chinese manufacturing firms: an empirical analysis based on the China Employer-Employee Survey data

Yue Deng, Shiya Huang, Limei Lin, Lu Ning, Cheng Zhang & Han Li

Pages: 90-105

Abstract: Based on the 2015 China Employer-Employee Survey data, this article presents descriptive statistics on collective and individual labor rights in Chinese manufacturing firms. The former includes data about rights pertaining to labor unions and collective bargaining, while the latter includes promotion and remuneration. The main findings are as follows. (1) Although the indicators vary widely in terms of firm-specific characteristics (e.g. size, capital sources, ownership structure, exporting, and industry), the overall protection level of collective labor rights in Chinese manufacturing firms appear to meet accepted levels with 61.45% of firms offering labor unions and 64.93% engaging in collective wage bargaining. (2) While a few employees did not enjoy individual labor rights such as promotions and social security (e.g. 40% workers had no opportunity for promotion), discrimination based on demographical characters (e.g. gender, Hukou, and education level) is not evident for employees’ individual labor rights.

Link to the original text:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538963.2016.1274007

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